Archive for February, 2013

What started as a peaceful demonstration by students of the Nasarawa State University early yesterday morning turned violent when two of them were killed by soldiers from 177 Guards Brigade Battalion, Keffi,  drafted to keep the peace. In the aftermath of that, the state Governor Umaru Tanko Al-Makura ordered the school shut t to avert a further breakdown of law and order.

The students had embarked on a peaceful demonstration to press home their demand for the restoration of water supply to the university community.

LEADERSHIP NEWSPAPER reported that earlier, the students had barricaded the Keffi-Akwanga Federal Highway from Keffi roundabout to students’ village, a distance of about three kilometers. Travelers and other motorists were trapped for several hours and efforts from the university authority to contain the situation through persuasion did not yielded much result after which the military were called upon but some of the students protested their presence and started throwing stones at them at which point the soldiers were forced to open fire.

Speaking on behalf of the students, the President of Students Union Government (SUG), in the institution, Mr. Rabiu Tijani Omameh of the Department of Accounting said for about three weeks students have borne the burden of water shortage on the campus, and added that “water is life without which we cannot continue with our education and it will make the environment harsh and hectic for us”.

A cross section of students who spoke to our reporter said that shortage of water has been a recurring problem in Keffi but the past three weeks have been the most excruciating as most of the wells dried up.

A 200 level student of psychology, Magdalene Omaku, said “students cannot find water to take their bath or cook and we have been trying to make our feelings known to the school management and we hope that the government will come to our aid and do something.”

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and The Oscar Goes to….

Posted: February 26, 2013 in Entertainment

It was a great night celebrating the best in movies at the 2013 Academy Awards held at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday (February 24) in Hollywood.

The big award of the night for Best Picture went to Argo and its producers Ben Affleck, George Clooney, and Grant Hezlov. The film also won the awards for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Editing.
Lincoln‘s Daniel Day-Lewis won the award for Best Actor, Silver Linings Playbook‘s Jennifer Lawrence won the award for Best Actress, Django Unchained‘s Christoph Waltz won the award for Best Supporting Actor, and Les Miserables‘ Anne Hathaway won the award for Best Supporting Actress.
HERE ARE THE NOMINEES AND WINNERS
BEST PICTURE
Amour
Argo – WINNER
Beasts of the Southern Wild
Django Unchained
Les Miserables
Life of Pi
Lincoln
Silver Linings Playbook
Zero Dark Thirty
BEST ACTOR
Bradley Cooper, Silver Linings Playbook
Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln – WINNER
Hugh Jackman, Les Miserables
Joaquin Phoenix, The Master
Denzel Washington, Flight
BEST ACTRESS
Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty
Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook – WINNER
Emmanuelle Riva, Amour
Naomi Watts, The Impossible
Quvenzhané Wallis, Beasts of the Southern Wild
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Alan Arkin, Argo
Robert De Niro, Silver Linings Playbook
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master
Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln
Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained – WINNER
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams, The Master
Sally Field, Lincoln
Anne Hathaway, Les Miserables – WINNER
Helen Hunt, The Sessions
Jacki Weaver, Silver Linings Playbook
BEST DIRECTOR
Michael Haneke, Amour
Ang Lee, Life of Pi – WINNER
David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook
Steven Spielberg, Lincoln
Benh Zeitlin, Beasts of the Southern Wild
BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Wes Anderson and Roman Coppola, Moonrise Kingdom
Mark Boal, Zero Dark Thirty
John Gatins, Flight
Michael Haneke, Amour
Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained – WINNER
BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Lucy Alibar and Benh Zeitlin, Beasts of the Southern Wild
Tony Kushner, Lincoln
David Magee, Life of Pi
David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook
Chris Terrio, Argo – WINNER
BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
Brave – WINNER
Frankenweenie
ParaNorman
The Pirates! Band of Misfits
Wreck-It Ralph
BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Anna Karenina, Seamus McGarvey
Django Unchained, Robert Richardson
Life of Pi, Claudio Miranda – WINNER
Lincoln, Janusz Kaminski
Skyfall, Roger Deakins
BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Anna Karenina, Jacqueline Durran – WINNER
Les Misérables, Paco Delgado
Lincoln, Joanna Johnston
Mirror Mirror, Eiko Ishioka
Snow White and the Huntsman, Colleen Atwood
BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
5 Broken Cameras
The Gatekeepers
How to Survive a Plague
The Invisible War
Searching for Sugar Man – WINNER
BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT
Inocente, Sean Fine and Andrea Nix Fine – WINNER
Kings Point, Sari Gilman and Jedd Wider
Mondays at Racine, Cynthia Wade and Robin Honan
Open Heart, Kief Davidson and Cori Shepherd Stern
Redemption, Jon Alpert and Matthew O’Neill
BEST FILM EDITING
Argo, William Goldenberg – WINNER
Life of Pi, Tim Squyres
Lincoln, Michael Kahn
Silver Linings Playbook, Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers
Zero Dark Thirty, Dylan Tichenor and William Goldenberg
BEST FOREIGN FILM
Amour, Austria – WINNER
Kon-Tiki, Norway
No, Chile
A Royal Affair, Denmark
War Witch, Canada
BEST MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING
Hitchcock, Howard Berger, Peter Montagna and Martin Samuel
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Peter Swords King, Rick Findlater and Tami Lane
Les Misérables, Lisa Westcott and Julie Dartnell – WINNER
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Anna Karenina, Dario Marianelli
Argo, Alexandre Desplat
Life of Pi, Mychael Danna – WINNER
Lincoln, John Williams
Skyfall, Thomas Newman
BEST ORIGINAL SONG
“Before My Time” from Chasing Ice, Music and Lyric by J. Ralph
“Everybody Needs A Best Friend” from Ted, Music by Walter Murphy; Lyric by Seth MacFarlane
“Pi’s Lullaby” from Life of Pi, Music by Mychael Danna; Lyric by Bombay Jayashri
“Skyfall” from Skyfall, Music and Lyric by Adele Adkins and Paul Epworth – WINNER
“Suddenly” from Les Misérables, Music by Claude-Michel Schönberg; Lyric by Herbert Kretzmer and Alain Boublil
BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
Anna Karenina, Production Design: Sarah Greenwood; Set Decoration: Katie Spencer
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Production Design: Dan Hennah; Set Decoration: Ra Vincent and Simon Bright
Les Misérables, Production Design: Eve Stewart; Set Decoration: Anna Lynch-Robinson
Life of Pi, Production Design: David Gropman; Set Decoration: Anna Pinnock
Lincoln, Production Design: Rick Carter; Set Decoration: Jim Erickson – WINNER
BEST ANIMATED SHORT FILM
Adam and Dog, Minkyu Lee
Fresh Guacamole, PES
Head over Heels, Timothy Reckart and Fodhla Cronin O’Reilly
Maggie Simpson in The Longest Daycare, David Silverman
Paperman, John Kahrs – WINNER
BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM
Asad, Bryan Buckley and Mino Jarjoura
Buzkashi Boys, Sam French and Ariel Nasr
Curfew, Shawn Christensen – WINNER
Death of a Shadow (Dood van een Schaduw), Tom Van Avermaet and Ellen De Waele
Henry, Yan England
BEST SOUND EDITING
Argo, Erik Aadahl and Ethan Van der Ryn
Django Unchained, Wylie Stateman
Life of Pi, Eugene Gearty and Philip Stockton
Skyfall, Per Hallberg and Karen Baker Landers – WINNER
Zero Dark Thirty, Paul N.J. Ottosson – WINNER
BEST SOUND MIXING
Argo, John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff and Jose Antonio Garcia
Les Misérables, Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson and Simon Hayes – WINNER
Life of Pi, Ron Bartlett, D.M. Hemphill and Drew Kunin
Lincoln, Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom and Ronald Judkins
Skyfall, Scott Millan, Greg P. Russell and Stuart Wilson
BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton and R. Christopher White
Life of Pi, Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer and Donald R. Elliott – WINNER
Marvel’s The Avengers, Janek Sirrs, Jeff White, Guy Williams and Dan Sudick
Prometheus, Richard Stammers, Trevor Wood, Charley Henley and Martin Hill
Snow White and the Huntsman, Cedric Nicolas-Troyan, Philip Brennan, Neil Corbould and Michael Dawson.

blame it on DSTV and Cable

Posted: February 26, 2013 in Uncategorized

Is satellite TV killing African football?
When satellite television started broadcasting the top leagues of Europe around the world in the mid-1990s, football lovers in Africa must have been unsure whether to laugh or cry.
On the one hand, they could suddenly watch some of the best club football on the planet – simply by turning on the TV.
At the same time, the realisation must have dawned that the local league they had been watching for years was a sub-standard product to the one found in countries like England, Spain and Italy.
It wasn’t always thus though – for African club football’s heyday came in the 1970s and 1980s when vast crowds, sometimes 100,000 strong, regularly flocked to league games and the leading pan-African club competitions.
By the 1990s, however, the state of Africa’s leagues had become a major worry.
The exodus of players to Europe, which today is a flood, was beginning to become significant, meaning local fans were denied the chance to watch the best talents as they left for greener pastures, while many leagues were also blighted by poor organisation, corruption, chronic infrastructure, low crowds and sometimes a combination of all four.
European football was most welcome when it arrived, as fans feasted upon the chance to watch legendary clubs like Real Madrid, AC Milan and Manchester United on a regular basis, but the impact on the diminishing local leagues – North Africa aside – has been less well received.
Empty seats
“The advent of satellite TV has certainly taken away the feel people had for the local league – more so when you have the likes of Lionel Messi at your fingertips,” Ghanaian football commentator Karl Tufuoh told BBC Sport. “It’s clear local attendance has been massively affected.”
Tufuoh was speaking at the Accra Sports Stadium, whose 40,000 red, yellow and green seats were more or less all visible for a league clash between top clubs Liberty Professionals and Asante Kotoko on a recent Sunday.
A few miles down the road, the bar at the Alisa Hotel was overflowing with fans who had come to watch two crunch English Premier League (EPL) clashes.
“Maybe if we had no option, we would have to follow our local league,” said one customer, Kojo. “But if you find something better than the local league, you would watch the better one.”
The situation in Ghana is far from unique – it is played out in countless African cities every weekend.
In fact, the attendances became so insignificant in many African leagues that they have been scheduling domestic kick-offs to avoid the big European matches.
However, there has been a recent reversal in the declining attendances as a previously-unseen factor has entered the market: Satellite television that now broadcasts some of Africa’s leagues.
In 2006, South African broadcaster Supersport started to air matches from both its own league and Nigeria’s on the DSTV network, which is broadcast across the continent for those who can afford it.
Seven years on, SuperSport also owns the rights to games in Kenya, Zambia, Uganda, Ghana, Angola and Tanzania.
Crowds up in Kenya
While the beneficial impact on some leagues has been questionable, such as in Zambia and Nigeria, one of the stand-out successes has been in Kenya.
Prior to SuperSport’s involvement, the domestic league was riddled by infighting, poor crowds, poor marketing and a chaotic fixture list.
Can African fans be persuaded to watch more local football?
The situation is now wholly different, with improved organisation added to the TV money that enables clubs to pay their players both well and regularly, making the league not only more attractive to fans but foreign players too.
“The first season we covered the KPL, you were getting a few hundred people for normal games and a few thousand for the big games,” says Gary Rathbone, former head of Africa for SuperSport.
“Last year, crowds were in their thousands for normal games and 25,000 for the big games. Another massive change was that the league sponsorship had increased from zero to something quite substantial.”
The success of SuperSport’s KPL coverage – which has included the creation of a studio, a weekly magazine programme and the coverage of over 100 live games – has been staggering.
Prior to the input, Rathbone estimates that 75% of the Kenyan media’s football coverage was devoted to Europe but he believes that figure is now equal – with perhaps over half sometimes devoted to the KPL.
A survey later revealed that the Advertising Value Equivalent of sponsorship for the KPL – which Rathbone now classifies as a “truly professional league” – amounts to a barely-credible $86m (£55m).
“That’s what happens when you get behind the league and broadcast it and organise it properly,” he says.
In his own South Africa, the TV audiences watching local games are double those of the EPL – even if the advertising revenue for the latter’s games is significantly higher, given the demographic being targeted.
However, slick television production can only take a league so far if it has perceived flaws – as those running Nigerian football have discovered.
Believing that the league is unattractive, amateurishly run and constantly haemorrhages its best players, Nigerian football fans – those backing Kano Pillars aside – have not come out in numbers to attend games.
In Zambia meanwhile, a former FA president says the SuperSport deal means fans now watch local games on TV – not just because they can watch the European games afterwards, but also for more simple reasons.
“In our stadiums, refreshments are not allowed – so why should I go to a stadium to be thirsty for 90 minutes when I can watch at a bar with a big screen?” asks Simataa Simataa.
So when African leagues complain about the impact of the EPL on their attendances, is this simply an excuse for their general laziness and incompetence when it comes to improving their product?
“To succeed, leagues have to become businesses but very few have grasped this yet,” says Rathbone. “They also need to explore other forms of revenue – like advertising and merchandise.”
“If the local leagues are run properly and it’s an interesting standard, the experience is positive and the media is supportive, there is no reason why the EPL and the local league should not live successfully side by side.”

An autopsy carried out at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital on Goldie has revealed that she died of hypertension.

the autopsy report on the right

the autopsy report on the right

The autopsy which was conducted on February 19th and signed by Dr. O. Oyewole, revealed that she had a “terminal hypertensive heart disease” which resulted in “intracerebellar haemorrhage “ – thus leading to her death…so this clears the air on the previous claims by some media and blogs – where it was alleged that the late singer died of drugs and pulmonary embolism.
Creative and boundary-pushing artiste Goldie died on the 14th of February 2013, just hours after she arrived from Los Angeles where she had gone to experience the Grammy Awards. May her soul rest in peace!

Keshi Resigns

Posted: February 11, 2013 in Breaking News, Naija Scene, News
Tags: , ,

Super Eagles Coach Stephen Keshi Resign!

Stephen Keshi

Stephen Keshi

A day after winning the Africa Nations cup, coach Stephen Okechukwu Keshi has resigned as the coach of the Super Eagles. He handed over his resignation letter to the Nigerian Football Federation after a dramatic falling out with the Federation.

He said something about not being given a free hand by the Minister.

more details soon